About Me

I am Associate Professor and Chair of the History Department at the University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth. I am also the Academic Director of the Clemente Course in the Humanities, in New Bedford MA. Author of "Social Security and the Middle Class Squeeze" (Praeger, 2005) and the forthcoming "Saul Alinsky the Dilemma of Race in the Post-War City" (University of Chicago Press), my teaching and scholarship focuses on American urban history, social policy, and politics. I am presently writing a book on home ownership in modern America, entitled "Castles Made of Sand? Home Ownership and the American Dream." I live in Providence RI, where I have served on the School Board since March 2015. All opinions posted here are my own.

Tuesday, June 14, 2011

Can capitalism be re-imagined? Or only undone?

William Greider edited a fascinating series in the most recent issue of The Nation, on "Re-imagining Capitalism."  Many of the entries are in keeping with Greider's work in his book The Soul of Capitalism: Opening Paths to a Moral Economy.

I'll have commentary on some of the entries in a bit.

4 comments:

Blog Master: Hey Now! said...

Mark - Happy to be first! Your blog is on my google reader list. I see that Eugene McCarraher of Villanova! has the most radical proposal. I searched for a proposal that addresses that nagging blindspot in capitalism and economic theory - "limits to growth". Many proposals seem to be from a middle class or wealthy perspective. Because of this a discussion of "limits to growth" are excluded because in the medium term wealthier groups will not experience these limits directly. The poor who number in the billions will directly confront "limits" of food, energy, and environment will not be helped any of these proposals. So, maybe McCarraher makes the most sense afterall.

Mason said...

Hey Now is Mason BTW.

Mark Santow said...

hey Mason -- awesome! The first is always the best...

I was drawn to McCarraher as well, as I'll write on the blog in a bit. I am a huge fan of his, because he brings together this really odd ideological mix: he writes about theology and religion, but he is also very conversant with Marxism. He seems to use both in equal measure to level a critique both at 'growth,' and at the moral assumptions and consequences of the form of capitalism we have created.

Mark Santow said...

Hey Mason -- the first is always the best...

I'll say more on the blog in a bit, but I agree with you. I've always been a fan of McCarraher, because he brings to the table an odd and interesting ideological mix: he writes about theology and religion, while being very conversant with Marxism. He uses both to criticize 'growth,' and the moral assumptions and consequences of the form of capitalism we live under. I've been waiting for his new book forever...